Information storage

Information storage

Information must be recorded so that it can be retrieved at a later time if it is to be used and manipulated fully. Chemistry innovations have ensured that the media for such recordings has remained high-quality, easy-to-use, and inexpensive. Breakthroughs in recording capabilities (higher resolution, faster speed, and color), photographic films, magnetic audio recordings, and digital imaging have also brought advances in recording devices.

A once indispensable equipment used for listening to music: the reel-to-reel tape recorderA once indispensable equipment used for listening to music: the reel-to-reel tape recorder

In 1955, Reynold Johnson, an American inventor and computer pioneer developed the first disk drive to store computerized data.

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In consumer electronics, a state-of-the-art solution offering the highest standard is the Blu-ray Disc, which is an optical disc storage medium designed to supersede the DVD format. While the currently available DVDs are able to store 4.7 GB of data, the Blu-ray discs offer a five-fold single layer capacity with 25 GB of information.

The initially used magnetic mediums (tapes, cassettes, compact discs, etc.) were gradually replaced by optical storage media formats (CD-ROM, DVD, Blu-ray, etc.), as these latter allow for better quality and longer durability.

Electronically-magnified image of a CD's storage density

Electronically-magnified image of a DVD's storage density

Electronically-magnified image of a Blue-ray disc's storage density