Affecting blood clots

Affecting blood clots

Heparin, a natural product isolated from animal liver, prevented thrombosis (blood clotting) during a blood transfusion in 1935, and became the most commonly-used anticoagulant (also called a blood thinner). It also prevents clot formation in cardiac and arterial surgery.

Blood cots may fully impede blood flow, which may lead to the break down of the circuatory system.Blood cots (a) may fully impede blood flow, which may lead to the break down of the circuatory system.

In 1955, wafarin (Coumadin), an orally-active anticoagulant that prevents strokes and treats heart attacks and thrombosis, was introduced as a new drug. During the 1970s, it was discovered that once clots had formed, they could be treated with thrombolytics. Utilizing enzyme activity to dissolve blood clots lead to Urokinase (1977), streptokinase (1978), and the genetically engineered recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, tPA (1987).

Did you know?

Red blood cells develop in the bone marrow and deliver oxygen (O2) to the body tissues via the blood flow through the circulatory system. They circulate for about 4 months, during which they cover a distance of 1,500 km.

Heparin molecule