The Impact of Her Work

The Impact of Her Work

The work of Marie and Pierre Curies meant the beginning of a new era in physics and chemistry, and it gave powerful impetus to the research of radioactivity conducted by the contemporary and the new generation of scientists. In the following years, scientists found the rules of radioactive decay.

Her daughter continued her research  – she was awarded a Nobel Prize for discovering synthetic radioactivity.Her daughter continued her research – she was awarded a Nobel Prize for discovering synthetic radioactivity.

Marie also receives the credit for enabling the contemporary and the next generation of scientists to carry out experiments with fissile materials. Her daughter, Irène Joliot-Curie also owed her achievements to her mother's work and findings. Shared with her husband, Iréne received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, in recognition of the discovery of artificial radiation in 1935. Based on these findings, James Chadwick discovered the existence of the neutron.


Curium, the element with the atomic number 96 was also named after the CuriesCurium, the element with the atomic number 96 was also named after the Curies

Madame Curie's work encouraged the medical application of radium to cure tumours.


In honour of the Curies, the non-SI measurement unit of radioactivity was named curie (Ci). Originally, one curie was equal to radioactivity of one gram of radium-226. Curium, a synthetic chemical element with the symbol Cm and atomic number 96, as well as three radioactive minerals, sklodowskite, and cuprosklodowskite were also named after them.