Marie, the Teacher and the Researcher

Marie, the Teacher and the Researcher

Beside her family life and research work, regular publishing and lecturing also formed an integral part of Marie's life.

It was Marie's mission to share her knowledge with her studentsIt was Marie's mission to share her knowledge with her students

In 1900 she was named a physics teacher to the faculty of the Normal School (École Normale Superieure) for Girls at Sèvres, where she was the first to introduce a teaching method based on educational experiments.


In 1906 she was asked to take over her late husband's post, and so, she was the first female professor at the Sorbonne.

First Solvay Congress, Brussels, 1911 – Marie is the only woman in a large group of famous scientistsFirst Solvay Congress, Brussels, 1911 – Marie is the only woman in a large group of famous scientists

In 1910 she published her fundamental treatise on radioactivity, under the influence of which a remarkable number of scientists started to study radioactive substances all over the world.


During the course of her life, Marie gave lectures in several European countries, and she also paid visits to the United States and Brazil.


Although she could have, she never accumulated great wealth either to herself or her children. When the Curies were offered huge amounts of money for the procedure of radium isolation, the two scientists shared their research findings and radium stock with the scientific world gratis.